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20110703
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
of cases that lawyers like tony handle. in the daytime i work for a big law firm of the type that tony probably would not hold in the highest of esteem, but i'm delighted to be here. you know, i think if you talked to most authors, they will tell you that there is something hot-wired into our system that says we need to try to tell a story. there is nothing at all in my background. i am an absolutely accidental writer. there is nothing in my background which suggests i should be writing novels. i grew up in chicago. i write books about san francisco. i studied accounting at the university of illinois. i have been a corporate and securities attorney for 28 years. i've now written seven best-selling novels about murder trials, death penalty cases, and courtroom drama. i have never handled a criminal case in my life. [laughing] so all of you out there who are thinking of writing novels, there is hope. but i did have this feeling a long time ago, probably from the time i was in high school, that at some point i would like to try to write a novel. and i can't explain why. i do know that whe
. >>> it will be a big day in the casey anthony murder trial. closing arguments in that murder trial is just a few hours away. court is scheduled to start at 9:00 a.m. eastern time. casey anthony, as you know, accused of murdering her 2-year-old daughter caylee yesterday. there was a vigil for caylee near the spot where her body was found. the case expected to go to the jury after closing arguments. this all began in late may. casey anthony facing seven charges, including capital murder. that means she could face the death penalty if she's found guilty. the defense and prosecution both wrapped up their cases last week. casey anthony decided not to testify in her own defense. more on that throughout the morning. >>> also, a jailhouse phone call is raising more questions about the accuser in the dominique strauss-kahn sexual assault case. the former chief of the international monetary fund was released from house arrest on friday. mr. strauss-kahn is accused of sexually assaulting a hotel maid and last week prosecutors said the accuser's story raised credibility questions. cnn national correspondent susan
with big business. they break stories on big business is being corrupt. then you have the right of center papers that are obsessed with big corporations -- i mean, with big government. there. it is cool parity i am not for the outing -- the suppression of the adding of corrupt republicans. there is a huge difference. i am totally for all of these republican screwballs to get into trouble getting fired or quit saying today that they get caught, not stretching out for three ludicrous unbelievably weeks. thank you very much, congressman weiner. thank you. i loved every second of it, congressman weiner. especially the hack part. i am the hacker. so we are fighting back. we are entering a phase where objective and neutral journalism is now laughable thing of the fast. it does not exist. i met the people that trotter pretzel themselves into being totally neutral. no one is neutral in the entire world. you have used the cudgel of false neutrality as a means to push the american narrative to the left for the last 40 years. to hell with it. i am sorry that i am being honest and i believe in freedo
is the big fight here. whether it's in education reform or transportation reform or pension reform. we have brought lab tore the table. they've been a part of the solution and i think thank them for that. >> schieffer: i must apologize. the sound dropped out. did you tell me you are going to sign it or not? >> i've got... can you hear me now, bob. >> schieffer: yes, i can. >> i've got about ten days to review the whole budget. you're asking i think in particular about the municipal health care part of it. it has come a long way toward what i want. i think there are a couple of parts of it i want to look at it more closely before i make a final decision. the broader point i was making, bob, is that for all of the reforms we have been doing, many of them like what my colleagues and other states have been doing, taking this opportunity to make government work better and focus more on the people served. we've had labor at the table. they've been a great part of it. >> schieffer: all right. let me go to the mayor. mr. mayor, you're not in charge of state budgets obviously but you are in charge o
, and it does not get any stronger than fdr. were big business interests attacking fdr at the time? you better believe it. they plotted a coup against him. he said i welcome their hatred, but i am coming. he came and did a new deal for this country and the middle- class. we created a middle-class between 1947 and 1977, the income of the bottom fifth group at a higher rate than the top fifth. that seems unimaginable now. look what happened. when you care about the middle- class, and democrats cared about the middle class, they fought for the middle class. fdr did that, and even up to the 1970's, liberals were so strong, they got richard nixon to pass that dpj, to start the epa. can you imagine? you had ralph nader running roughshod in the 1970's. seat belts, osha, the list goes on and on. of all the regulations we did to help real america, why did it change? people say ronald reagan. it was before reagan. supreme court -- two supreme court decisions made all the difference. political speech was a first amendment right. the disaster began there. in 1978, first national bank of boston said that c
thing is like one big test. >> it's fascinating watching you because i know you don't like watching yourself, do you? >> i've gotten a lot better. since i've been producing, i've gotten a lot better with it. when i started, i had a really -- i hate my voice. i hate the way i sound. and i think that was always hard. >> that's not your real voice, is it, that's the problem. >> yeah, maybe, because it sounds foreign. but since i've become a producer and i've had to kind of, you know, sit in editing rooms and sit for hours and watch footage be cut together, i think -- i think i've gotten better to kind of take myself out of it and really look at it as making a film. and you kind of take all that weight off just yourself, which has been really great for me as an actor. >> you bring incredible intensity to this stuff. scare the life out of me. i'm just watching it from a monitor. you're like a raging volcano in some of these parts. >> a raging volcano who likes to clean. >> yes. the most weird type of raging volcano. >> look, that film, taylor hackford, the director of that film, cast me
-- drudge report to." -- report." he reports on the big spending and hypocrisy of the left. one of his essays that gave me and my friends a weekend of celebrating was the perfectly executed release of the acorn videos. [applause] and in fact, andrew breitbart is so skilled at allowing the left that a leftist organization called media matters for america -- another boo? called "new yorker" magazine. the guy said this as if he was making a horrible accusation against andrew. he said, "andrew brietbart in gauges in daily twitter warfare against the left." [applause] to which andrew was like, "i sure do." and his following soared on twitter. at that point, media matters' was even angrier. they launched the brietbart blogging parody contest. you can imagine how much that added to his twitter following again. i do not know what andrew is going to talk about. but i think we are all in for a fun time. thank you. [applause] ["friday," rebecca black] >> that is right. and thank you. thank you. who wants to see the photo? who wants to see the codex -- p hoto? what a large, large, large room. oh m
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)